Top 5 Reads of December 2021

Apoptosis is a bodily function that plays a role in preventing cancer. It is the natural process that rids your body of damaged or unwanted cells. If you’ve never come across the term before, you might want to read more about it on Zendy! You can learn more about various scientific, biochemical, and physiological processes like artificial gene amplification and extension, cell physiology, immunohistochemistry, immunoblotting, and more on Zendy. More importantly, you’ll be able to narrow down your search results for each keyword string you enter by subject, publication, language, or origin.

Once again, we’ve rolled out our top reads to give you a brief idea about all that you can find on Zendy. In this month’s top 5 Zendy reads, you will learn more about the advantages and significance of pharmacy automation, the cognitive and psychological benefits of music therapy, the linguistic and extra-linguistic elements of stylistic devices in English discourse, how business information managers and other professionals are dealing with the corporate repercussions of the pandemic, and potential teaching methodologies that can help overcome the challenges of teaching history courses.

Here are Zendy’s top 5 reads for December:

Pharmacy Automation

1. Five Trends in Pharmacy Automation. (Magazine Article)

Without pharmacy automation, pharmacy staff might be tied down to carrying out mechanical tasks like counting pills. Instead, these professionals’ expertise and time can be repurposed. Pharmacy automation has the ability to reduce expenses, save space, and increase security. This article from the Hospitals & Health Networks magazine lists all the benefits and the recent trends of implementing smart, automated cabinets in hospital pharmacies. By eliminating the need to report on drug inventories, nurses will have more time to consecrate to patient care and other life-saving or administrative tasks.

To learn more about how automated cabinets can improve efficiency and help reduce the risk of narcotic abuse among hospital staff, click here.

Dementia and Music Therapy

2. “Don’t Let Me Go” – A Case Study on Music Therapy in Early-stage Dementia (Case Study)

Science is just beginning to uncover the ways in which music can be therapeutic. In this detailed case study, we come to meet Ana, a lovely lady in her 70s, who suffers from early dementia. Throughout the music therapy sessions conducted, Ana gradually opens up to her therapist, who learns of her emotionally traumatic experience of losing her daughter. Becoming familiar with the session structure and not being confronted about her confusion or disorientation, Ana became less resistant to therapy and grew more relaxed throughout her sessions. Singing seemed to be Ana’s preferred musical engagement, so her therapist guided her in writing a song following the parody technique. Since Ana was already familiar with the melody, this ensured that she wouldn’t be overwhelmed with too much new information. After some weeks of engaging with her new therapist, Ana was reading poetry, reciting hymns, and had already written a song about her family.

Step into Ana’s music therapy sessions and learn more about how to comfort and connect with people with dementia. Read the full case study here.

Para-linguistic Analysis

3. Cognitive and pragmatic approach to using stylistic devices in English literary discourse (Research Paper)

Discourse theory has evolved a lot since the great philosopher and sociologist Michel Foucault first coined the term. Similarly, different theories and advances in literary and linguistic studies have affected how we view, interpret, and analyse language. This paper examines language and literature through the lens of cognitive, discourse, and pragmatic theories. The author applies these theoretical considerations to 20th-century works of literature to demonstrate how semantic, syntactic, and extra-linguistic factors influence the production and perception of meaning. To exemplify these principles, the author refers to antithesis, a stylistic device. Contemporary scholars have moved away from absolution when it comes to interpreting meaning. Increasingly, weight has been attributed to the text’s contextual factors, the readers’ cultural backgrounds, immediate surroundings, personal experiences, and what the author refers to as the “cognitive structures and processes that underlie the production and reception of language”.

To continue reading about how linguistic factors and pragmatic constituents play a role in making stylistic devices more appealing to audiences, click here.

Turning Crisis into Opportunity

4. ‘Never let a good crisis go to waste’ – The 2020 Business Information Review Survey: Part I. (Journal Article)

The Business Information Review Survey is a reputable, peer-reviewed publication that has been running for 30+ years. This article from the journal combines insights from leading information managers that work in different sectors, such as financial services, law, professional services, manufacturing, mining, and technology. The conversations among these professionals centre around changes in corporate structure, staffing, the impact of technology, content delivery, working arrangements, and client engagement. Several participants shared their strategic priorities for the coming year, and perhaps not surprisingly, most of these priorities were consistent across different organisations. It seems clear that continuous efforts towards organisational alignment and readiness to respond to changing demands and needs make for unmistakable pillars of success among today’s information managers.

Continue reading the first part of this article and learn more about recent experiences with organisational models and staffing trends here.

History of Psychology Teaching Methodology

5. Teaching the History of Psychology (Journal Article)

History courses tend to be less engaging than other courses simply because of the static quality of the course content itself. Prof. Christopher D. Green’s experience with teaching History of Psychology courses is not different. In this article from the Canadian Psychology journal, Prof. Green analyses students’ attitudes towards the course material and proposes different approaches to render it more entertaining and relevant to psychology students. For one whole semester, Prof. Green collected public tweets from students about the course only to find out that most of them displayed a sense of boredom and resentment. To bring the course material closer to undergraduates, Prof. Green suggests offering a deeper and often broader context to events which led to the birth of different theories and schools of thought, connecting events and intellectual developments through causal relationships whenever possible.

Wondering why students struggle to relate to dry subject matter in history courses or how to motivate and further engage them? Read the full article to learn more.

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